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What Austism? ‘Peppa Pig’ Catalyst In Rescuing 2-Year-Old Boy

Peppa Pig Austism: Children’s Show Helps Firefighters Rescue 2-Year-Old Boy; Exposure Affects Children’s Brain Development?

From helping a firefighter save a child to letting a child develop autism, what are the effects of being exposed to Peppa Pig for children?

A 2-year-old boy got his arm stuck in a radiator. While the firefighters are getting his arm out, Peppa Pig helped in distracting the boy to keep him calm.

The Godstone Fire Station fire crew assembled at around half-past five in the morning after they were called in Godstone Road, Whyteleafe. In order to extract the boy’s arm from the radiator, the firefighters took the radiator off the wall. While this was being done, Peppa Pig is playing in the television, which caught the little boy’s attention.

One of the fire crew said the boy is okay and with “no distress whatsoever.” Within a few minutes, they were able to free him with the help of Peppa Pig entertaining him in the background.

Thanks to Peppa Pig, the rescue was done in a breeze.

Meanwhile, reports claimed that watching the children’s show can actually cause the development of autism for children. How true is that?

An alleged Harvard research circulated on social media reported watching Peppa Pig everyday, with at least half an hour exposure, for children can lead to higher risks of them developing autism.

The said study was conducted in Harvard University as of 2012. After the report raised concerns on social media, further research revealed that the “study” was a hoax.

Not only is it not true that exposure to Peppa Pig can affect a child’s mental development, but the research is not even found in the school’s web pages. Moreover, Marc Wildemberg, the alleged “epidemiologist” who conducted the research, is neither from Harvard University nor an epidemiologist.

Rest assured, watching Peppa Pig will not raise the risk of autism for the little ones albeit precautions should still be followed as too much of something is not always good.

Photo source: Flickr

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